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myfriendsaremarried:

…because I’m pretty sure I am.

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myfriendsaremarried:

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myfriendsaremarried:

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myfriendsaremarried:

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selchieproductions:

But what if I want to wear indigenous jewellery?

Having had enough of the massive rift between the Hipster parasites and the everything’s-cultural-appropriation community, I have finally decided to write a post of do’s and don’ts when it comes to cultural appropriation and jewellery. Yes hipsters, you can wear some things, no hipsters, you do not get to choose what you get to wear.

  1. Most indigenous communities are dependant upon the selling of traditional art and jewellery to generate incomes, to completely ignore this and boycott all forms of indigenous jewellery would in the end do more damage to the community, than if one were to wear said thing in the first place.
  2. This does however not translate as ‘everything goes’ - some things have a cultural value which makes them, both in theory and practice, unwearable by outsiders; among these things I would list, in particular, traditional clothes, war bonnets and religious regalia.

  3. Furthermore, when buying an indigenous piece of jewellery it is of utmost importance to buy said piece of jewellery from a recognised indigenous artist; buying a dream catcher made in Taiwan, or a Saami wristband sold by H&M is an act of cultural appropriation, as it strips the community of something which is specific to them, without giving anything back to said community, whereas buying a thing from an artist in many ways help the community.

  4. If the thing you’re wanting to buy doesn’t have a clear description of who made it, where it’s from, and its cultural significance, don’t buy it.

  5.  If a member of an indigenous community from whence your piece of jewellery comes is offended by your wearing of it, take it off. Simple as that, don’t argue about it, just respect their opinion.

  6. Never buy anything that has a religious undertone with the intent to wear it; personally I get all itchy when I see people with noaiddi drum necklaces, and I guess some Native Americans feel the same about people who wear medicine wheels or dream catchers. 

  7. If a member of a native community gives you a piece of indigenous jewellery as a gift, do NOT decline out of fear of engaging in cultural appropriation; it would be far more rude to decline the offer of a gift, at least this is the case among the Saami, and most other communities I am familiar with.

  8. Never question the price of an indigenous piece of jewellery - the income generated from the selling of one single piece of jewellery is often split up among several families, and unless you’re willing to pay for the time someone spent on creating the piece of jewellery that you’re wanting to wear, don’t buy it.

  9. If you’re buying from a second hand source, always request details with regards to whom made your jewellery. 

Hope this helps.

A final note;

  • If I see you with a war bonnet I am going to get upset. 

(via rematiration-deactivated2013111)

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mtcv:

itsallfuckinghappening:

Anti-austerity protests across Portugal, 15th September 2012

The black flags are the most powerful symbol.

(via allaboutportugal)

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blocodeespantamentos:

A woman embraces a riot policeman in front of the IMF office during a protest against austerity in Lisbon

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rudolove:

SENEGAL SKIN LIGHTENING // Zed Nelson published in Marie Claire Russia

One of the worst consequences of racism is the point when the black people start thinking less of themselves because of the color of their skin. It is only natural, since everywhere they look there are white or at least whiter people of them as exponents of a better life, better jobs, etc. White people (and especially white woman) is set as a beauty standard and all the black girls are trying their best to look more Caucasian. It is really disturbing and sad, but these are the consequences of the lifestyle and propaganda against the black people that was active for many years.

Senegalese women argue that paler skin helps them stand out from the crowd, and the majority of Senegalese men say they prefer women with lighter skin. In the photo: a dermatologist in Dakar keeps photos of people with severe consequences of using this sort of tools for skin whitening. She says that people are aware of the risk, but continue to use these products, and then come to her with the consequences.

Fonte | Source: 

(Fonte: africlecticmagazine, via thefemme-menace)

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Separados à Nascença | Separated at Birth →「¿Namie Kaulitz? 」「¿Tom Amuro?」

Namie Amuro na revista Popteen, Março de 2005; Tom Kaulitz numa sessão fotográfica por Bernard Mouillon, Janeiro de 2008; Tom Kaulitz numa sessão fotográfica para o álbum Zimmer 483, por Jens Boldt, em 2007.

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Namie Amuro for Popteen magazine, March 2005; Tom Kaulitz in a photoshoot by Bernard Mouillon, January 2008; Tom Kaulitz in photoshoot for the Zimmer 483 album, by Jens Boldt, 2007.

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Fonte | Source: Namie-Fans.netFreiheit 89

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Reynaldo Gianecchini numa sessão fotográfica para a revista Mensch, em Julho de 2012. | Reynaldo Gianecchini in a photoshoot for Mensch magazine, July 2012.


(´∀`)♡

Fonte | Source: Ego

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Reynaldo Gianecchini para o site Ego, em 2006. | Reynaldo Gianecchini for Ego website, 2006.

Fonte | Source: Gianecchini.us

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Mas porque é que eu tenho a maturidade de uma pita de 13 anos, que de cada vez que olho para estas fotos, tenho a vontade de desatar em risinhos como uma parva histérica? (〃・・〃) | But why must I have the maturity of a 13-year-old, that each time I look at these photos, I get the urge of giggling like a mad woman? (〃・・〃)

Aquela primeira foto mata-meeee! T_T | That first picture is killing meeee! T_T

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…says Jezebel.

My thoughts at that moment:

"Oh… my… God… I… am… SO… happy…!!!”

Seriously! (ღ˘⌣˘ღ)

Straight girls & gay men, click the link. You won’t regret it 〜

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(I’m not gonna celebrate Harry’s pictures though; he made a mistake — not by having fun, but by being careless — and the fact that so many people are now happily scrutinizing his body is both creepy and voyeuristic. There’s a difference between consensual nudity and pictures taken in a moment of drunken vulnerability that somebody leaked without your permission. The fact that he’s a boy doesn’t change that! Scummy people! ¬¬)

(Edit: Now that I think about it… didn’t Harry have a girlfriend?  *googles* Yeah, he did. Jerk. I thought it was still Chelsy though.)

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RESPOSTA | ANSWER
Anónimo said: You'll always be a Lufa-Lufa~~! XD

And you’ll always be a halfling-breeding machine. ¬¬

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Fernanda Serrano na versão portuguesa da revista Vogue, edição de Dezembro de 2003. Linda! | Fernanda Serrano for the portuguese version of Vogue magazine, December 2003. Gorgeous!

Fonte | Source: sunsey @ The Place

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Se ela estiver feliz, eu fico feliz! | If she’s happy, I’m happy!

(´∀`)♡

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triad636:

ポロ~ロン

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